Differentiate your business with an impactful logo.

The importance of having a well-designed logo cannot be stated enough. In many instances, a logo is the first impression a business or organization gives the consumer/audience and, like any first impression, the hope is that you make a good one.

So what is a logo?

Is it a recognizable icon?
Is it a wordmark?
Is it a brand?

The short answer is yes; a logo can be all of the above.

However, a logo can be considered to be so much more. It can be personified as an extension of your business, your brand, or yourself. It is how a business or organization wants to be perceived, visually, in the most simple form.

SOME OF THE THINGS A LOGO CAN COMMUNICATE ARE:

  • Personality: personification of an organization
  • Value: luxury, cost of service, etc.
  • Location: physical or geographical
  • Story: the literal story of what the business does

HERE ARE SOME EXAMPLES:

Personality:

Let’s look at the logo for Yahoo. The varying letter sizes have a playful, whimsical feel and are meant to represent a yodel’s sound waves. The sophisticated, chiseled features of the letterforms reference architecture which is said to represent the logo as the foundation of the brand, products and user experience.

Yahoo_Logo

Value:

For this category we are going to look at the world of fashion, specifically Armani. Giorgio Armani is considered to be one of the most noted fashion empires in the world. The Giorgio Armani logo is a prime example of a minimal, yet elegant logo design. The icon is comprised of a stylized representation of the company’s initials – a rounded “G” completing a curved “A” – which portray a very tasteful and refined identity. The Armani brand logos feature a basic black and white colour scheme, which creates a natural feeling of warmth and conveys a powerful yet luxurious impression.

armani_1

Location:

The CFL Grey Cup logos for the past three years are a perfect example of logos that depict a physical location. The core of the logo remains consistent with the Grey Cup icon front and centre encompassed by a ring that houses the name and number of the event and the host city/province. Inside the ring is a graphically simplified illustration of the stadium and landscape specific to the host city. Because I’m an avid Rider fan I’m going to use the 101st Grey Cup logo as an example. The illustration consists of the iconic Talyor Field at Mosaic Stadium with its lights shining bright into the wide open prairie sky. Taking a little artistic licence the stadium is then placed on a freshly ploughed field. The big open sky and the wheat field are synonymous with the province of Saskatchewan.

144566a

Story:

For this last category I’m going to use one of my favourite logo examples, the FedEx logo. The concept is especially simple, but oh so effective. FedEx, which is an abbreviation of Federal Express, is a courier/delivery company that delivers packages from point A to point B. What better way to symbolize that process than by using an arrow icon that points left to right. Here’s where the brilliant simplicity comes in. The FedEx logo is a wordmark, the “E” and he “x” are kerned tightly, that is to say that the space between the letters are reduced to the point that they are just touching. The negative space between the “E” and the “x” make a pretty bold arrow shape. To accentuate this, the “Ex” is done in a separate colour to the “Fed”. Once you recognize the arrow, it literally becomes the first thing you see the next time that you look at the logo. Simple and Effective.

FedEx-logo-big

The underlying theme here is that a well-designed logo is a thoughtful, strategic, visual story of what a business/organization is at its core.

To hear more about great logo design, check out the article, 4 essential characteristics of good logo design.

Get the best value for your logo.

Save time and money with these 6 simple steps for great logo design. This free eBook will walk you through what it takes to make a logo that will make an impact on your audience, streamlining your efforts, and giving your brand the feel it should have – ultimately increasing your bottom-line.

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